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Cyber Seminars

Past Cyber Seminars

Tuesday, June 18, 2013 -
2:00pm to 3:00pm
EDT

Understanding and improving the health, safety, and well-being of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) individuals is a growing public health concern and is a goal for Healthy People 2020.   The June National Cancer Institute (NCI) Research to Reality cyber-seminar will explore several health disparities this population faces across the cancer continuum. Join us as we feature research, programs, and resources designed to assess and address cancer health disparities facing sexual minorities.

Tuesday, May 21, 2013 -
2:00pm to 3:00pm
EDT

Having an understanding of the health of your community in relation to other communities/states can be an important factor in health planning and programming.  The May National Cancer Institute (NCI) Research to Reality cyber-seminar will explore two resources that are designed to help users assess the health of their communities using a variety of data sources, and then to use that data to create solutions and implement programs for a healthier community. 

Tuesday, April 16, 2013 -
2:00pm to 3:00pm
EDT

The field of public health genomics has exploded over the last several years as more and more states are collaborating around cost-efficient, evidence-based methods to enhance cancer screening and prevention efforts.   Join the National Cancer Institute and Research to Reality (R2R) on April 16th as we explore opportunities and advances in this exciting field and the opportunities for collaboration between state and local health departments, cancer registries, and research institutions, to improve the care and programs provided across the states.    &nbsp

Tuesday, March 19, 2013 -
2:00pm to 3:00pm
EDT

As the social ecological framework shows there are several levels -- including intrapersonal, interpersonal, organizational, community, and policy— and that determinants within these levels interact with one another to influence behavior and health outcomes.  Studies have shown multilevel interventions which address determinants at a number of levels and mutually reinforce one another produce longer and more sustained effects than interventions that target only one level.

Tuesday, February 26, 2013 -
2:00pm to 3:00pm
EST

Adhering to some basic principles for presenting risk information to patients and individuals can improve understanding. However, different risk communication methods may be needed for individuals based on culture, literacy/numeracy, and other factors.  Join us February 26th as we explore the use of storytelling and other strategies for risk communication in culturally diverse and underserved populations.    

Tuesday, January 15, 2013 -
2:00pm to 3:00pm
EST

Join us January 15th as we discuss how to use data to make a local impact.  The National Cancer Institute’s (NCI) Research to Reality January cyber-seminarwill highlight State Cancer Profiles. This resource is part of Cancer Control P.L.A.N.E.T. and is supported by the NCI and CDC.  The State Cancer Profiles Web site provides a system to identify the cancer burden in a standardized manner in order to motivate action, integrate surveillance into cancer control planning, and expose health disparities.

Tuesday, November 13, 2012 -
2:00pm to 3:00pm
EST

Join us in November as we continue the exploration of practice-based evidence and how it can inform your own community’s efforts to engage partners in the adaptation of evidence-based interventions.

Tuesday, October 9, 2012 -
2:00pm to 3:00pm
EDT

Join us in October as we continue the exploration of practice-based evidence and how it can inform your own community’s efforts implementing interventions within healthcare systems.

Tuesday, September 11, 2012 -
1:00pm to 2:00pm
EDT

The translational gap between research and practice has long been discussed, often as a one-way street – get practitioners to recognize and utilize the research that is being conducted.  While important, equally important is the reverse – integrating practice-based evidence and context into the research conducted.  We need a bridge between the two, not a pipeline.

Tuesday, July 10, 2012 -
2:00pm to 3:00pm
EDT

The personal and economic costs of cancer health disparities are incalculable. The medically underserved are more likely to be diagnosed with late-stage diseases that might have been treated more effectively or even cured if diagnosed earlier.  To effectively improve the health of our communities we need to understand and address these disparities.  Yet, before we address them systematically, we first must measure and then continue to monitor them.